Frequently Asked Questions

  • Yes, Duke's is gluten-free.

  • No, Duke's is not GMO-free.

  • Yes, Duke's is kosher.

  • Duke's Fat-Free Mayonnaise has been discontinued, but Duke's Light Mayonnaise (with half the calories and fat of our real mayonnaise) is a great alternative.

  • Duke's Whipped Salad Dressing has been discontinued, but you might like Sauer's Whipped Salad Dressing.

  • Yes, we run Duke's coupons in the Sunday paper throughout the year in areas where Duke's is sold in stores. Like us on Facebook to receive updates about our newspaper coupons. Coupons are also available at our sampling events. Check out our Duke's events page to see upcoming Duke's events near you.

  • Yes, they are interchangeable in most recipes, including baked goods. Duke's Light Mayonnaise can stand more heat than Real Mayonnaise.

  • Yes. Think of Duke's as though it were any kind of shortening or margarine... it's perfect for making grilled cheese sandwiches or baking a chocolate cake!

  • Freezing dishes or sandwiches made with mayonnaise is not generally recommended. The results may not always be successful, depending on the type of recipe and the amount of mayonnaise used. However, baked goods prepared with mayonnaise as shortening freeze well.

  • Soybean oil, eggs, water, distilled and cider vinegar, salt, oleoresin paprika, natural flavors, calcium disodium EDTA added to protect flavor.

  • Yes. To protect the great flavor and wholesome ingredients, it is recommended to refrigerate Duke's Mayonnaise after opening.

  • Unopened jars of mayonnaise and mayonnaise dressing may be stored at room temperature. Refrigerate the jars after opening to keep the fresh flavor of the Duke's Mayonnaise. High temperatures will accelerate loss of fresh flavor while exposure to freezing or near freezing temperatures can change the consistency, texture, and thickness. Excessive heat during storage can result in browning and off flavors, also.

  • Mayonnaise, as defined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Standard of Identity, must contain at least 65% oil by weight, vinegar, and egg or egg yolks. It may contain spices and natural seasonings except turmeric and saffron, as yellow color might suggest added egg yolk. No emulsifying agents other than eggs are allowed, so real mayonnaise does not contain any starches or gums.

  • The higher the altitude, the lower the air pressure. Increase your oven temperature to 375°F, start checking doneness up to 8 minutes earlier, decrease sugar by 1 tablespoon plus 1½ teaspoon (it's easiest to measure out the full 1½ cups and then remove the excess), increase flour by 2 tablespoons, or increase Duke's by about 3 tablespoons. It may take a couple tries to get the recipe right at your new altitude, so try to make only one change to the recipe each time you bake and keep track of which changes worked and which ones didn't.

  • Yes, Duke's Real Mayonnaise is the only major mayonnaise on the market that contains no sugar. This is important for individuals on a restricted sugar diet.

  • No. 0%.

  • The jars we use for our Duke's varieties are made with PET (polyethylene terephthalate) and have a recycling code 1. They have no BPA additives and is the same plastic used in most water and soda bottles. They are recognized as safe for food by the FDA.

  • A common misconception about mayonnaise is that salads made with it become rancid in the heat and can cause illness as a result of spoiled mayo. The truth is that mayonnaise is highly acidic with a pH between 3.8 and 4.6, which prevents harmful bacteria from growing in food. Typically, food-borne illnesses due to “spoiling” are caused by items dressed by the mayonnaise, and not the mayonnaise itself.

  • Yes, all eggs used in Duke’s Mayonnaise are pasteurized, which means they’re heated in order to destroy illness-causing pathogens like salmonella.